Thursday, 29 June 2017

A Ballet: Forbidden Love

Act 2, scenes 1 and 2

Epoch 1872: mid-summers eve
Setting:  glade in ancient woodland
Principals: Ballerino with Prima Ballerina

Scn.1  
            And now, the Stradivarius begins.
            With such graceful fluidity you glide;
            I slide forward, in awe of your beauty.
            Oh, ballerina, the dance lives for you.

            Heavy hearted, and with arms open I’m 
            seduced by your arabesque, arms allongé
            reaching for clouds that scurry across a
            true love on this warm celestial night.

Scn.2
            A symphonic cacophony, then hush . . .
            The violin leads your adagio.
            My heart falters, ragged in peasant clothes.
            Sadly, I ask, ‘is this to be your swan song?’

            Coquettishly, you tilt your head, listen,
            the piccolos tune frees you from the trance;           
            and the Stradivarius plays with gusto.
            “Dear ballerino, forever we shall dance.”

End.
Curtain call

Julian Clarke © 2017








29 comments:

  1. Very clever. (and in the boudoir...)

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    1. Hi Martin, thank you for your comment, it's much appreciated as always. Have a good day.

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  2. This is highly unusual, at least in my travels, regarding how you've presented this piece - but I love the play of it all - the way you've taken one way of creating, set for stage etc. and by nature of how it's written, it unfolds in true poetic fashion - a definite touch of the Shakespearean, which adds to its charm - and the plea and longing, the request - then the response - it paints a delightful scene in my mind! Cheers!

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    1. I am so pleased that you enjoyed this piece, of which I really enjoyed writing. I felt it warranted something different to make it work. Thank you for your remarks, WildChild

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  3. Oh, this was a wonderful read this morning."forever we shall dance" in glades of grass, one can hear the melody and get caught in the rhapsody of the words.

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    1. Thank you and I'm pleased you enjoyed reading my poem.

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  4. Such a great idea to write the tale in Acts.

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  5. A symphonic cacophony, then hush . . .
    The violin leads your adagio

    Fantastic word craft Julian! Among them the above which appears simple enough outwardly but brilliant in form!

    Hank

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  6. I really enjoyed the form & the classical touch!

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  7. This is wonderful! A stirring play, within a poem. Such wonderful imagery. I saw the whole thing.

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    1. Hi Sherry, so glad you liked it.

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  8. Love the song and the seduction between the violin and the ballerina.

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    1. Thank you, Bjorn, much appreciated.

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  9. It paints a sweet or bittersweet moving picture in my mind. A poem that calls up music, dance to express emotion.

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    1. Tahnk you, Colleen for you remarks and I'm pleased you enjoyed it.

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  10. Conjures great visuals. Well written. Thank you.

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  11. I truly enjoyed the form and the classical touch!❤️

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    1. Thanks, Sanaa, and I'm so glad you enjoyed my poem.

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  12. Richard Fleming2 July 2017 at 22:31

    An unusual approach. Lyrical and lovely.

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    1. Thank you, Richard, for your continued support. Hopefully catch up soon.

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  13. oh what a musical masterpiece this was. I definitely enjoyed it on this lazy Sunday afternoon here in the US. thanks for sharing it with us. what joy!

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    1. Thank you, J.T your comments, very much appreciated. I shall visit your page a little later.

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  14. What a majestic poem, like the ballerina.

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Comments are very much appreciated and I shall endeavour to reply, however, this may not always be possible due to time restraints.