Tuesday, 9 August 2016

The Legend of Cherokee Rose

My poem is after these photos and short write up.

I took these photos whilst holidaying in North Carolina. Above is the entrance to the Indian reservation in the Great Smokey Mountains in North Carolina, life is shown as it was before the Indian removal act was signed into law by President Andrew Jackson on May 28, 1830.

Below is one of the rivers flowing through the mountains.


White Cherokee Rose found on the trail of tears, 
this image is from the internet,


The following poem was inspired by the persecution of the Cherokee Nation by the white settlers. They were displaced from their own lands and had to walk approximately 2200 miles from here, and neighbouring areas such as Georgia, to Oklahoma. This became known as the trail of tears where many died.


The Legend of Cherokee Rose

In the year of eighteen thirty,
White settlers wanted more land
Congress passed “the Indian removal act”
And so their displacement began.

From Georgia to Oklahoma
Lies “the trail where they cried”
The weather grew bad disease took hold,
Thousands of Cherokee Indians died.

Children perished along the way,
Mother hearts filled with grief,
Prayers for a sign to lift their spirits
Offered up by the five Indian chiefs.

Their prayers had been answered
To help lift the women folk soles,
For where a tear fell to the ground,
A beautiful rose did grow.

Five petals, for the five major clans,
A yellow centre for the unmined gold;
And so a legend was born,
The legend of Cherokee rose. 

© Julian Clarke 2016

Below shows the view looking down onto the morning mists floating over the mountain valley.


22 comments:

  1. Man's inhumanity to man never ceases to stun me... A wonderful poem and tribute, Julian, in response to such a tragic event...

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    1. Hello Nicholas, never cease to amaze me too, sadly I don't think it will ever stop. Thank you for your thoughtful comment.

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  2. This flows effortlessly - like you absorbed the history and sense of place completely - and such a beautiful rose

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    1. Thank you Jae, for your kind comment, there's so much history to absorb.

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  3. Beautiful, sad, well wrought. Luv the aspect of the rhyme to waver in the seriousness of this legend.
    Thanks for dropping in to read mine Julian

    Much love...

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    1. Your kind remarks are very much appreciate Gillena.

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  4. A powerful poem. The "Indian Removal Act" is a sad chapter in our history. Thank you for immortalizing, with your words, this heinous action.

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    1. Thank you, Mary, for your kind comment

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  5. “The legend of Chirokee Rose” breaks my heart. History of this world is smeared with blood everywhere.

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    1. Hi Sumana, much appreciated as always.

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  6. A tragic legend, so wonderfully told.

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    1. Thank you Susan, I'm pleased you liked it.

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  7. I love the legend of the Cherokee Rose....how meaningful. I know about the Trail of Tears - in northern Canada we have a Highway of Tears where missing and murdered Aboriginal women have been "disappearing" for years.

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    1. Sherry, so pleased you liked it and thank you for your kind thoughts.

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  8. Beautifully penned...Julian.
    Something so pretty to represent,....yet, a tale so sad!

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    1. Panchali, thank you for your kind thoughts

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  9. even though this is so sad i loved reading this with its rhyme.

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    1. thank you Jasmin for your comment

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  10. Beautiful images, beautiful poem.

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Comments are very much appreciated and I shall endeavour to reply, however, this may not always be possible due to time restraints.